Category: Research

Youth Unemployment Statistics

In February 2024, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reintroduced Labour Force Survey (LFS) data, which also includes a population reweighting. This is after only some experimental headline data was published between October 2023 and January 2024 due to falling response rates.

There were 481,000 young people aged 16 to 24 who were unemployed in October to December 2023, a decrease of 10,000 from the previous year.

Youth unemployment is currently at a historically low level. Youth unemployment fell to 406,000 in May to July 2022 which was the lowest recorded level since records began in 1992. However, since then it has been gradually increasing.

Read more here.

Unemployment – National: Key Economic Indicators

In February 2024, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reintroduced Labour Force Survey (LFS) data, which also includes a population reweighting. This is after only some experimental headline data was published between October 2023 and January 2024 due to falling response rates.

There were 1.32 million unemployed people in the UK in October to December 2023, a decrease of 13,000 from the previous year.

481,000 young people aged 16-24 were unemployed in October to December 2023, 10,000 fewer than the year before.

The unemployment rate for 16‑24 year olds was 11.6%, an increase from 11.5% a year before.

Read more here.

Employment – National: Key Economic Indicators

In February 2024, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reintroduced Labour Force Survey (LFS) data, which also includes a population reweighting. The ONS have said these estimates should be treated with additional caution.

33.17 million people were in employment in October to December 2023. Employment was up 72,000 from the previous quarter and up 107,000 from the year before.

The employment rate (the proportion of the population aged 16-64 in work) was 75.0%, down from 75.2% a year previously.

Read more here.

Over £1 billion awarded to roll out lightning-fast broadband in hard to reach towns and villages

The government’s rollout of next-generation broadband is steaming ahead with around £1.1 billion in contracts now signed to connect 677,000 rural homes and businesses across England.

Six new contracts worth more than £450 million were announced on the 6th February, allowing suppliers to immediately begin detailed surveying work to connect around 236,000 premises across England, with the first premises expected to be connected in early 2025.

The upgrades will help grow the economy, create jobs and deliver long-term change for a brighter future by making it easier to set up a business, and giving rural communities access to networks designed to meet people’s needs for decades to come as the demand for fast connections continue to rise.

Read more here.

20,000 more young people to access new and renovated youth clubs

Young people in villages, towns and cities across England are set to benefit from 140 new or refurbished youth centres thanks to the largest funding round to date from the Government’s Youth Investment Fund. 

Totalling more than £90 million, funding announced on the 3rd February will support nearly 20,000 more young people per year to access new state of the art facilities such as workshop spaces, sports halls, art rooms, recording studios and skateparks.

Activities ranging from dance, drama and music to sport, horticulture and employment skills development will be on offer, giving young people access to opportunities that broaden their horizons.

Read more here.

Employment of people living in rural and coastal communities

Employment rates in constituencies which are predominantly rural and inland were highest in October 2022 to September 2023, at 78.2%. 

Economic inactivity (people not in work and not looking for work) was highest in rural and coastal constituencies (21.9%) in October 2022 to September 2023. Rural inland constituencies had the lowest economic inactivity rate (19.6%).

The Government’s Levelling Up the United Kingdom white paper states seaside towns are among those areas with the “highest levels of community need and poor opportunities for the people who grow up there”, while rural areas can be low in “connectivity, skills and productive capital”.

In September 2022, the Rural England Prosperity Fund was launched and designed to fund capital projects for small businesses and community infrastructure, with the aim of improving productivity and strengthening the rural economy.

Read more here.

IES Monthly Round Up: January 2024

The Institute for Employment Studies published this briefing note, on Wednesday 31 January 2024, and it sets out analysis of the current Labour Market Statistics.

Although there remains significant uncertainty around labour data, figures show the labour market continuing to cool down, with vacancies falling by a further 50 thousand on the quarter (to 935 thousand) and earnings growth dipping below 6%.

However, they also show an unexpected slight improvement in the estimated employment rate, driven by falling ‘economic inactivity’.

Read more here.

The St Martin’s Group launches a new report: ‘Enabling Better Outcomes: A Wider View of Apprenticeship Success’

In partnership with the Learning and Work Institute, the new report launched by the St Martin’s Group examines what apprenticeship success looks like to employers and builds on previous research into the apprentice perspective of completion and outcomes.

The new report finds that while 99% of employers recognise the benefits of offering apprenticeships, they face barriers in supporting the apprentice to successfully complete.

The report offers a series of recommendations to improve outcomes, including supporting more employers to provide off-the-job training and pastoral support, which the research indicates lead to higher completion rates.

Read more here.

Policy and service to children and young people’s mental health in England

This briefing covers Government policy on Children and young people’s mental health services (CYPMHS) from 2011 to present.

It looks at how children and young people’s mental health services in England work and sets out relevant Government policy and statistics.

In 2023, 20% of children aged 8 to 16 had a probable mental disorder.

Among young people aged 17 to 19, the rates of probable mental disorder increased from 10% in 2017 to 18% in 2020 (a statistically significant increase).

Between 2020 and 2021 the rates remained similar before increasing again between 2021 and 2022, from 17% to 26%. In 2023, rates remained fairly stable at 23%.

Read more here.